Shoe Review: Reebok OSR Harmony Road 2

A do-everything trainer with loads of cushioning and an energetic ride

Reebok OSR Harmony Road 2

Price: $120

Specs: 10mm heel-toe offset; 30mm (heel), 20mm (forefoot)

Weight: 10.8 oz (men’s size 9), 9.2 oz (women’s size 7)

The Scoop: Reebok is trying to make a comeback in running (again!) and the second edition of the Harmony Road shows the brand is on the right track. What’s interesting about this shoe (which is named after an idyllic running route in Fort Collins, Colo.) is that it’s a contemporary cushy cruiser with a mix of both modern and throwback design elements. Built on a triple-density midsole (softer and cushier in heel, firmer and energetic in the forefoot), the shoe offers a sublimely soft feel when the foot hits the ground and a resilient sensation as the foot rolls to the toe-off phase. (Two of the foams are fairly standard EVA-based compounds, but the third one is a very responsive TPU-based foam core known as KooshRide that puts a spring in every stride.) The upper is made from a single very breathable mesh reinforced with two welded overlays and a firm heel counter. Overall, it’s a well-cushioned, very durable and protective trainer with a traditional (10mm) heel-top drop.

Who’s It Best For: This is a surprisingly good, do-everything, high-mileage trainer that beginner to advanced runners will find useful. The reason it’s so versatile is because it runs so well at both slow and fast speeds. Our wear-testers loved it for long slow runs and recovery runs, but we also liked it a lot for tempo runs, fartlek workouts and progression runs.

Plus: The gusseted tongue is a nice touch and really adds to the fit of the shoe, creating a snug cocoon around the foot.

Minus: The biggest drawback about this shoe is that it’s a bit heavier than many of the shoes in this review and its similar neutral cushioned trainers. The excess weight seems to come from the large amount of outsole rubber and some of the overlays across the upper.

Adam W. Chase
Adam W. Chase has run more than 150 marathons and ultra-distance races. At this point in life, he writes faster than he runs and also serves as President of the American Trail Running Association and works as a lawyer in Boulder, Colo.